Wednesday, September 16, 2009

Beacon Street Details

Here's one picture that shows many of the elements of the new Beacon Street bike lanes:

  • Wide lane next to parking
  • Stencils
  • Lane next to the curb where there's no parking
  • One of the buffer zones


Updated: The bottom picture is of the westbound lane. (It's late afternoon and the sun is ahead.) The lane ends right at the Boston/Newton border. The foreground is Boston. The background is Newton.

Also, I don't expect the sadness to last long. Newton plans to continue the bike lanes to Hammond (or start them from Hammond, depending on the direction you're traveling).

Here's a detail of a buffer zone.



And, this is the sad end of the bike lanes, at the Boston/Newton line.

3 comments:

hynespb said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Filigree said...

Very nice! Maybe the end is more of a "to be continued"...

Anonymous said...

We should indeed be thankful for the intelligent accommodations made for bicyclists and pedestrians on Beacon Street. But those of us who genuinely care about pedestrian, bicyclist, and motorist safety need to rise up and beg the City of Newton to back off from a life-of-its-own bad idea to construct an alleged traffic-calming bump-out at the corner of Jackson and Daniel Streets in the "Thompsonville" section of Newton Centre, 02459. This shoddily conceived, execrably constructed smear of asphalt and orange bins has, for over three years, rightly been denounced by a large majority of area neighbors as "The Funnel of Death." It remorselessly aims downhill traffic from Jackson Street closer to approaching eastbound drivers. May it not be so, but it appears likely, very likely, someone will +die+ in an accident here, because of the relentless advocacy for this project by someone, or some people, maybe in this area, who prefer a "Traffic Calming" trophy to tout in a ward or citywide election over bona-fide social good and safety. If you care about bicylists, pedestrians, and innocent human life, please get involved in the Jackson-Daniel Streets "traffic calming" project.